Compost Training in the North - Lamai Serengeti

This year we had our partner compost trainers from ’The Guardian Project' in the North training neighbouring villages and camp teams from Lamai Serengeti. Over 50 people in the communities were trained, and our camp teams took the opportunity to learn from their special guests while they were based at Lamai. T heir 'Soil Restoration Through Organic Fertiliser’ training gives farming families from villages bordering the Serengeti a zero-cost environmentally-friendly and accessible-to-all sustainable alternative to chemical fertilises.

Rita from The Guardian Project introduces the compost methodology to local men and women. This simple and accessible knowledge can be applied to their ’shambas’ - household gardens and small farm plots. It is training like this that gives communities a sustainable alternative that not only helps them boost their farming yields for better food security at home or more produce to sell at market, but also helps ease some of the practices the damaging land and water around.

We ran workshops with neighbouring communities, with theory and practical demonstrations on this simple compost & organic fertiliser methodology.

There was a great turn out and reception to the workshops in the villages, and people all went home keen to try out the new practices on their little plots. Our camps staff at Lamai were also super eager to learn about organic fertiliser, and turned out en masse for a presentation in the Mess Hall.

Jeff from The Guardian Project spent lots of one on one time with Jairo and other individuals at camp who took a particular interest in the methodologies they were teaching.

Chacha got his hands dirty helping prepare some of the materials for the practical demonstrations in the village trainings. He was especially keen to help since one of the trainings was involving his home village.

In camp lots of the team chatted about their experience with chemical fertiliser and the trainers Rita and Jeff shared their experiences from other countries across East Africa.

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