{ "data": [ { "title": "Lamai Serengeti – Officially Tanzania’s Leading Safari Lodge", "slug": "lamai-serengeti-officially-tanzanias-leading-safari-lodge", "date": "22/11/2021", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/nomad-blog-listing-image-lamai-wta.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/nomad-blog-header-image-lamai-wta.jpg", "mainContent": "

Every year, the World Travel Awards committee convenes to nominate camps, lodges, hotels, and experiences of all sorts from all over the world for all manner of accolades.  

We were over the moon when we got the news that Lamai Serengeti was lucky enough to be in the running for Tanzania’s Leading Safari Lodge, up against some stiff competition.  

We put the word out to everyone we knew – it’s been a tough old year, and the good news of a prestigious award would mean the world to our crew who’ve worked so hard and made Lamai the lovely kopje-top spot that it is.  

We’re delighted to say that we were rewarded with an abundance of votes, and many kind words and fond memories along with them. People shared their experiences, holiday snaps and good wishes, cheering us on all the way - it meant the world to see how many folk hold Lamai in a special place in their hearts.  

Needless to say, we were proud as punch when the results came in – we won! What’s more, it’s a hat trick victory – we were thrilled to have taken home the title in 2019 and 2020 too. So, Lamai Serengeti is officially Tanzania’s Leading Safari Lodge – and we have the badge to prove it.  

Thank you for your votes – we’re happy as honey badgers.

" }, { "title": "Three times the charm", "slug": "three-times-the-charm", "date": "07/02/2019", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/lamai7feb2.jpeg", "headerImage": "", "mainContent": "

It was a day like any other, our car slowly rumbling onwards. We had already seen quite a number of birds on the way, but were rather hoping to get a glimpse of rhino. Then as we drew into a new area, a few kilometres head we glimpse 3 large animals, we crept forwards not quite sure yet what they were. 

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As we got closer, we realised that we were looking at 3 Rhino!

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As we moved passed the herd of Topi and Zebra, they came into clearer sight.

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Mama Julie was in front, a well known resident Rhino. She has lived here for many years and guests are often getting lucky with sightings of her.

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Normally when guests see Mama Julie, she is with her youngest calf (who is actually quite big). Although today, she was with two calfs. This is her eldest calf, and she was born without ears.

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Her youngest is a spitting image of her mother.

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When we saw then, they were all gazing peacefully in the open plains. Such a sight to behold. 

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The youngest calf started to get jealous that her elder sibling was around, and on a few occasions, tried to force her away.

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Mama Julie didn't mind, and she kept on grazing.

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The eldest was adamant on staying together.

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As they slowly walked away, she was right at her mothers' heels.

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Such a wonderful outing, and I can't wait to catch up with them again.

" }, { "title": "International Waterbird Census", "slug": "international-waterbird-census", "date": "24/01/2019", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/1_7.jpg", "headerImage": "", "mainContent": "

On the 12th and 13th of January this year, we were privileged to be a part of the International Waterbird Census.

Started in 1967, the census hopes to monitor Waterbird populations, identify wetlands of international importance and assist in protecting and managing Waterbird populations around the globe. The census takes place every year in over 100 countries, with participation of over 15,000 counters, most of whom are volunteers. Why count waterbirds? Simple, waterbirds are well known indicators of the quality of certain types of wetlands, and a lack of water birds in a specific area, could indicate a deeper, underlying environmental issue.

(Our team, prepared and ready for the count).

(We focused our count along the Mara and Bologonja Rivers) 

(Yes we have time for goofy group shots too, such a great team building event)

I am so proud of what the team accomplished; 425 waterbirds counted, covering a total of 25 different species. Information like this is crucial and I can’t thank the team enough for making it possible!

" }, { "title": "Olakira Pride", "slug": "olakira-pride", "date": "03/01/2019", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/4_5.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/9_1.jpg", "mainContent": "

It started out a wet afternoon as we set out from camp to find the Olakira Pride.

I had never seen this pride myself, but had heard that three lionesses had birthed 6 cubs, of two different ages. 2 were still quite small, while 4 were a touch larger. I knew roughly where they were, so we headed out in the general direction. A big storm was brewing in the east, menacingly looking our way, making me wonder if we would even make it. We crossed a small gully, took a sharp left turn, and we started heading north, away from the storm. Amos, one of our guides, had given me directions over the walkie talkie. \"Head straight to Olakira rocks\" he said, \"and at the back, where the largest boulder is, start looking on the left\". He then told me that the mothers had tucked away the cubs for the last few days, so he had only seen about 3 of them in total. It was about a 30 minute drive there, and as we were approaching Olakira rocks, we were met by the entire pride, right on the road! A great surprise!

Amos told me they had killed and eaten a Zebra 3 days ago, and I knew that they would be hungry again, and possibly in search of their next meal. It was exactly this that brought them out of the Kopje's and onto the open grassland this evening: they needed to hunt. Led by the above Lioness, who seemed more hungry than the others.

The second lioness was not far behind, and was \"on duty\" with the youngsters, as they ran around tackling each other in the grass.

Wait for me! The smallest of the cubs lagged behind and had a short run to catch up with the others. At that age, 20 meters seems like 200!

As they approached the edge of the plains, they climbed up some rocks to get a better view of the valley in front. This mothers' patience has been tested, and tells the cubs to settle down. Insert

The last Lioness has a look backwards, making sure all the cubs are here, and that there is no threat from behind.

This little cub decided to stay close to mummy! Insert Image 7 The walked through the long grass about another 400 meters until they found their resting spot that they would stay in until sunset.

This lioness had spotted a herd of about 500 Wildebeest on the ridge line in front of them. This was her plan all along. Move the pride towards the gully at the bottom of the valley, tuck in the cubs, and set out hunting during the night.

The cubs, completely unaware of the plan, follow through the grass innocently.

It is play time now, but not without an awkward smile for the camera.

Getting a good spot next to mummy.

A friendly little kiss.

This is where we left them. This was the place the had chosen to spend the last hour of daylight, before the hunt begins. It was great to see this pride for the 1st time, and I'm glad they took me on an adventure with them, and thankful they let me into their life for an hour or so. I wish them well on their hunt, and hope to catch up with them soon to see how the little ones are getting along!

" }, { "title": "Vulture cam", "slug": "vulture-cam", "date": "05/11/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/4_4.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/2_4.jpg", "mainContent": "

With the great wildebeest migration still going strong in the north, scavengers, like these White backed Vultures, have plenty to eat. Lion, Leopard, Cheetah and Hyena have plenty of food, targeting the young gnu's that were born earlier in the year, leaving many carcasses like these to scavengers.

They were, at first, hesitant of coming close, but hunger soon prevailed.

Inspection time!

Vultures often fight on kills, trying to get access to the best part of the carcass.

Hoping to share more Carcass came image in the months ahead!

" }, { "title": "The next generation", "slug": "The-next-generation", "date": "09/10/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Image_5.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/image_8.jpg", "mainContent": "

It has been about three weeks now since the first of our resident Hyrax families have given birth near the dining area. We have close to 15 little babies, and it is amazing to see them grow each day. From suckling from their mothers, to scurrying over the rocks and jumping on each other and to sleeping on top of one another; needless to say, they have stolen our hearts.

There are some individuals that have really gotten to know us well, and allow us to get quite close.

Some are confident enough to turn our furniture into their playground.

Some are still quite shy and aren't yet sure what to think.

While others prefer to play outside on the rocks, staying close to their parents.

\

Its going to be amazing watching the families grow over the next few weeks. I'll make sure to update everyone on their progress!

" }, { "title": "Hamerkop heaven", "slug": "hamerkop-heaven", "date": "10/09/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/01._Hammerkop_470_313_.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/02._Hammerkop_470_264_.jpg", "mainContent": "

How lucky we are to have a Hamerkop pair building a nest right in camp! It’s been so much fun watching this pair collet material for their nest each day, and I’ll tell you what, they are very hard workers. 

For those of you who aren’t familiar with Hamerkops, they are a medium sized wading bird, who are known to build the largest nests in the world, relative to their size. 

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In Afrikaans, it was given the name “Hammerhead” due the shape of its head, with the long bill to the front and the crest at the back.

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For hours a day they can be seen flying to different parts of the lodge, collecting grass, mud and sticks for their nest

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Both the male and female will help build the nest and they can build up to four nests a year. 

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Hopefully we get to see some Hammerkop young in the not too distant future.

" }, { "title": "Tanzanian Pride", "slug": "tanzanian-pride", "date": "23/08/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Pride4.jpg", "headerImage": "", "mainContent": "

It is said that flags were introduced in time of war, where they were used to assist with military co-ordination on the battle field. Whether it be signaling an attack or a retreat, as well as organizing troops and military positions on a battle field. Flags have been found from the 3rd millennium BC, and found in all shapes, sizes, and made out of different materials, such as bronze and paper.

Over time, flags have carried more meaning. They aren’t just used for signaling, but are also used for advertising, as well as to symbolize different organizations or countries. Every country in the world has a flag that symbolizes them, and in some countries, you may find certain states within that carry their own flag – like Catalonia in Spain. Flags from around the world all hold special meaning to each country, and designs have been chosen specifically to symbolize what the country stands for. Some flags may stand for Freedom and Democracy, while other flags may depict historical events, and others may have religious meaning.

What I love about the Tanzanian flag, is that it stands for none of the above, but rather stands for the people and the natural resources (land and water). After all, that is what makes up the country, and I feel, is the most respectful and beautiful way of symbolizing a country.

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(The current flag of Tanzania which was made in 1964 after the merging of Zanzibar and the Republic of Tanganyika)

The green triangle in the top left stands for the agriculturally rich farms in Tanzania (Agriculture being about 24% of the GPD), as well as standing for all of the protected land set aside for wildlife. About one third of the land in Tanzania is protected in one way or another (and some may argue that the number is higher). Tanzania is the largest East African Country, and the 35 largest in the world, so to set aside that much land for wildlife, is simply amazing. Tanzania has 16 National Parks; whose combined area is larger than countries like the Netherlands and Denmark. Tanzania also has 17 Game Reserves, the biggest being the Selous Game Reserve, and is the largest protected game reserve in Africa, single handedly larger than Switzerland alone. 

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(The great plains of Northern Serengeti)

The blue triangle on the bottom right stands for the Indian Ocean and all of the bodies of water in Tanzania (Rivers and Lakes). The three largest lakes on the African continent all make up the western border of Tanzania and play a pivotal role in day to day life. Lake Victoria is the largest freshwater body in Africa (second largest in the world), Lake Tanganyika is the longest freshwater lake in the world (2nd largest in the world by volume, 2nd deepest in the world and the 2nd oldest lake in the world), and finally Lake Nyassa, which is the second deepest lake in Africa (9th largest in the world). Tanzania also has a large number of rivers that feature in the top 10 longest in Africa, most notably known is the Rufiji River which is uniquely Tanzania. It flows from southwest Tanzania and drains into the Indian Ocean.

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(Flying into the Selous Game Reserve)

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(Boating on the mighty Rufiji River)

The thick, diagonal, black line in the middle relates to the strong cultural identity of Tanzania. There are over 120 different distinct ethnic groups and tribes in Tanzania, each which their own language. Most Tanzanians would speak a minimum of three languages, whilst other may speak four or five. All of the tribes are spread all across Tanzania and are generally built up of famers, hunter gatherers or pastoralists, although many are working in the tourism sector as many have a huge passion for wildlife and conservation.

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(At Lamai, our staff come from over 10 different tribes and they are the happiest people I have ever met).

Lastly, you have 2, golden diagonal lines, one on each side of the black band, that symbolizes the mineral wealth that Tanzania has. Home to the only knows site of Tanzanite (named after Tanzania), this gem is 1,000 times rarer than diamonds and can only be found in one place on earth – Merrerani hills in Northern Tanzania. Tanzania is also home to many other precious and semi-precious gems and metals such as Diamonds, rubies, emeralds, sapphires, gold as well as having its own natural gasses.

Tanzania is a vast country, filled with such diversity in culture, wildlife and geography, we are lucky to call it home. It surprised us every day, teaches us every day and makes us stronger each day. I hope you were able to learn a little bit about this amazing country, and who would have thought you could learn all of this by learning about the flag?

How well do you know your flag?

" }, { "title": "Through the lens", "slug": "through-the-lens", "date": "15/08/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/001.2Safari_.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/001.9Safari_.jpg", "mainContent": "

Tanzania has over 1 million tourists visit each year, and people flock here at different times of the year to witness many of the wildlife, cultural and geographical spectacles that Tanzania has to offer. From Mt. Kilimanjaro, the tallest free-standing mountain in the world, to the blue waters of the Zanzibar Islands, to the warm, friendly people of Tanzania, there is always something new to see.

One of the biggest attractions, is the Serengeti National Park and its yearly Wildebeest migration. Drawing in huge numbers of visitors, Tanzania has become a top destination in Africa and has become synonymous with the word “Safari”. Interestingly, the Swahili word “Safari” comes from the Arabic word “Safar” meaning “journey”.

We recently hosted a lovely couple, who journeyed here all the way from California to witness the migration in Northern Serengeti. They are amazing photographers and all of the images below were taken by them. A big thank you to Brad and Holly for sharing their experiences with us and we wish you all the best in the future!

 

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(Holly gazes out into the distance, watching the approaching herds of Wildebeest).

 

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(Wildebeest as far as the eye can see)

 

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(A morning game drive is not complete without breakfast in the bush and a nice hot coffee. Jairo pours the best cup of coffee in the Serengeti).

 

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(The Mara river has generous populations of Hippo, and is the main focus of the migration during this time of they year)

 

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(Lunch with a view)

 

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(A Leopard enjoying his meal)

 

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(The struggle to cross the Mara River each year is very real. Even for the older, more experienced Wildebeest, it is a life or death journey. The river is full of Crocodiles and predators wait on the other side).

 

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(A young Lion seizes the opportunity to catch a Wildebeest after it has crossed).

 

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(The face of success).

 

It has been an amazing journey for Brad and Holly and I know they will be back one day. We hope to keep sharing amazing images like these with you.

" }, { "title": "Things that go bump in the night", "slug": "things-that-go-bump-in-the-night", "date": "24/07/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/01.3_.JPG", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/01.1_.JPG", "mainContent": "

We have been very happy with the incredible sightings that guests have been having recently. The migration has reached Northern Serengeti and there is a lot of action around every corner. So, I thought this was the perfect time to share with you some images captured on our remote camera from around camp. Plenty of animals pass by camp but are never seen. Here are some of the highlights from the last few weeks and months.

 

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(So beautiful, africa’s next top model?)

 

Since the Wildebeest have moved into the area, we have been hearing Hyena calling every night. It will get more interesting over the next couple of weeks and I am sure we will see a few walking through camp.

 

\"\"(Much smaller but maybe more elegant?)

 

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(Hoping to capture a better image of this Leopard soon)

 

This Leopard lives in front of the lodge and has been found out by the resident herd of Elephants on multiple occasions. They keep trumpeting and pushing him higher into the Kopje’s before retreating away.

 

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(It is always a joy to see our resident band of Dwarf Mongoose)

 

The lovely animals are the smallest carnivore on the African continent and we are lucky enough to see them every day. They more around our 3 properties each day, generally stopping by our office in the AM to say good morning.

 

\"\"One of my favourite nocturnal animals; the Genet. Always graceful, very quiet and incredibly beautiful.

 

\"\"(Posing for the camera)

 

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I was so excited to see that we had finally photographed a Porcupine, and equally disappointed that it had rained at night and the water drops on the lens had distorted all of the images!!

 

The remote camera is out every night, and stay posted in the days and weeks ahead to see what we find. What are you hoping we capture?

" }, { "title": "Schools out for the day!!!", "slug": "schools-out-for-the-day", "date": "13/07/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/001.11_.png", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/001.2_.jpg", "mainContent": "

We have been very privileged and honored to have hosted 2 school trips over the last couple of weeks. The first was a group of 6 students from the Merenga school and the second was 6 lovely, young girls from the Hope for Girls and Women Center in Mugumu.

 

Nomad, and in particular the Nomad Trust, is currently working with both of these lovely organizations to better understand how to help. The Hope for Girls and Women Center is one of our newest partnerships, as the project was only started a year ago, and it helps protect young girls who are fleeing female genital mutilation; something that is illegal in Tanzania, but very hard to inforce.

 

The aim of the trips was to show the youth of Tanzania, particularly those who live in close proximity to a National Park, the benefits of tourism and long term conservation. None of the students that visited us had any family members who worked in tourism, and none had ever stepped into a National Park, so to have them all here and show them what is involved with running a lodge was absolutely amazing. 

 

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(both groups started with a talk about the overview of the lodge and day to day operations)

 

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(It was amazing to see how interested these groups were about everything, their eyes were flying all over the lodge as there was so many new experiences.

 

\"\"(On the way there, we were lucky enough too see a Klippspringer)

 

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(They loved the rooms, especially the two-way coffee cupboards built into the wall… that’s my favorite part too!)

 

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It is amazing how much a trip like this can change someone’s life and open their world and eyes to something new. Last year, this little girl was lucky enough to visit Denmark through the Hope for girls and women center and you can already see she is viewing the world from a different angle. 

 

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We then went to the kitchen, where all of the students got to speak to our chefs and find out about cooking. 

 

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(A quick lesson in how to identify a Hyena footprint)

 

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After the tour of the lodge, one of our young trainees, Vicky, spoke to the girls about a life in tourism and her personal experiences in the field. 

 

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(Maybe a future Nomad Guide?)

 

It would personally like to thank all of the teachers and the students for being so amazing. I truly believe that these students’ lives will never be the same after these trips. It only takes one small moment, one thought, one experience to change someone’s life forever and set them on a course they had never previously imagined embarking on.

 

One of our cooks at Lamai started his career in a similar way. Emanuel lives in Katavi, and when he was a young boy, he got the chance to meet Roland Purcell and visit Greystoke in the Mahale Mountains. From that day, he knew what he wanted to do in life, and today, he is an amazing member of our team at Lamai Serengeti. 

" }, { "title": "Its a macro world!", "slug": "its-a-macro-world", "date": "22/06/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/001._Macro2_.jpg_.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/001._Macro3_.jpg_.jpg", "mainContent": "

For people who love photography, Macro photography is MUST to get into. There are photographic opportunities all around, you just have to train your eyes to find them.

 

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Starting out can be difficult, but the best way to start is to grab your camera, head outside, and walk around. That’s it! Within meters you should be able to find something to photograph, even a fly on a leaf. The macro lens completely blurs out the background, allowing your subject to stand out. Having other elements in the photo can be quite nice, like the texture of this leaf.

 

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Shooting with a macro lens, doesn’t necessarily mean you always have to photograph bugs; look for flowers, seeds and textures too. 

 

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I have found that if you don’t have a macro ring flash (I don’t), you need to have plenty of natural light, and the more you have, the better and easier it will be. I started photographing this Robber fly on F2.8 and found that the depth of field was so narrow, that only parts of him were in focus. I ended up capturing this image at f9, but had to bump my ISO up to compensate for the drop in light, and the end result, was far better than my first.

 

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There are different focal length macro lenses, and each one has its selling point. I opted for the Canon 100mm f2.8. This focal length allows me to stand slightly further back than I would if I was using a 60mm, and for photographing snakes and spiders, you want that!

 

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Next, look at the composition of your image and ask yourself, what do you have in the foreground and background that can help compose and frame your image. Here, I decided to shoot through some leaves, which frame both the top and bottom of the image. This gives your final image much more depth. 

 

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After that, it’s up to you to see what you can find and photograph. For me, photography is a way to learn about subjects I am not familiar with. Before this image was taken, I could not have named this insect, but since I photographed it and looked it up in an insect book, I can now proudly say that it is Dropwing Dragonfly.

 

\"\"Enjoy yourself and photograph as many small and curious wonders that you can find!

" }, { "title": "Open Season", "slug": "open-season6", "date": "14/06/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Open_Season_6.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Open_Season_5.jpg", "mainContent": "

We have all had an amazing time at home during the long rains and everyone has had some much needed time with their families. We are all charged up and are all so excited to be back in camp for this upcoming season. Smiles all around, energy over flowing and the lodge is looking amazing!

 

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(The first seven sunrises of the new season, with many more to come)

 

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(Lamai main mess in beautiful morning light)

 

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(A view that stretches into Kenya)

 

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(Our family have returned to the office since we have started up normal bush hours)

 

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(Mkombe’s House looking as beautiful as ever)

 

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(A pool with a view, and what a nice one it is!)

 

Stay posted for more as the season unfolds!

" }, { "title": "The end of an amazing season!", "slug": "the-end-of-an-amazing-season", "date": "17/03/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/1EOS12.JPG", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/1EOS4.JPG", "mainContent": "

Since we started managing Lamai at the beginning of January, we have had such a magical time. This beautiful area, tucked away in far north Serengeti, has so many wonders and amazing creatures that make this place home. From the incredible team we have in camp, making everything run smoothly, to the small little Agama lizards that scurry along the paths, everyone and everything, makes the experience at Lamai wonderful. We couldn’t have asked or hoped for a better start to our time at Lamai.

The season has finally come to an end, and we are in the process of slowly packing up camp. We have an exciting two months ahead of us, full of maintenance and some exciting new ideas for the season to come. Can’t wait to see how it all goes!

From everyone here at Lamai, we say goodbye for now, and we will be back in May to open again for the new season. We leave you with some of our highlights from the last two and a half months.

\"\"

(the view from the top of the Kopje)

 

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(Dinner with a view)

 

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(Our resident Mwanza Flat-headed Rock Agama, Peter Parker)

 

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(Early morning light)

 

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(Natasha making friends with the Hyrax)

 

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(Cheeky selfie with one of the little ones)

 

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I could stay here forever!

 

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(The view from the main area)

 

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(A very full Mara river, and a very wet day in the north)

 

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(So adorable)

 

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(This is the biggest stick insect I have ever seen!!!)(This is the biggest stick insect I have ever seen!!!)

 

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(Leopard passing through camp in the night)

 

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(The Mongoose family that stops by the office every morning to say hello)

 

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(These babies have taken on Natasha as their mother)

 

We will miss everyone greatly over the next few months and cant wait to see everyone again soon. All the best from us here at Lamai!

" }, { "title": "Leopard Breakfast", "slug": "leopardrd-breakfast", "date": "10/03/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Leopard1.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Leopard3.jpg", "mainContent": "

It was a lovely morning watching two Leopards eat in a tree, unfortunatey, the big male kept to himself in the dense branches, but the younger Leopard was much more active.

 

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Our best view of the younger one climbing down the tree

 

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Coming down to go to the Loo! (We found out after)

 

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A few minutes spent by this small termite mound, before a few chunks of bones and meat fell from the tree that needed to be investigated.

 

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After spending a few minutes munching on some scraps, this Leopard decided to climb back up the tree

 

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It's amazing how effortless they make climbing look

 

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One last leap

 

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You can now see the leg of an Oribi hanging in the tree. It was here the Leopard dissapeared into the branches and continued eating.

" }, { "title": "Spiderman?", "slug": "spiderman", "date": "28/02/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/agama1.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/agama5.jpg", "mainContent": "

This creature is the Mwanza flat-headed rock Agama and is one of the most beautiful lizards I have ever seen. The males are much more brightly colored than the females, and this plays a big role when mating. Due to its color, it has been nicknamed the Spiderman Agama, due to his resemblance to the comic book super hero. Even though they can be found on the international pet trade, they are of “least concern” and unlikely that any trade is impacting this species.

 

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(Mwanza flat-headed rock Agama or Spiderman Agama)

 

\"\"(These lizards can run on their hind legs only if they need be)

 

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(Agamas mainly eat insects although they will also eat grass seeds and berries too)

 

Males are very territorial and will do a number is displays to try ward off any rival males. If need be, males will fight and some may even lose their tails during the process. They hold a small territory in which a male may have up to six females within to mate with.

 

\"\"(females are much smaller and duller than the males)

 

\"\"(Juvenile male within the territory of an adult male)

 

\"\"The male photographed in this blog lives very close to our office and it’s such a pleasure to see him every day.

Any ideas what name we can give him? We were thinking Peter Parker!

" }, { "title": "Elephants, the gentlest of giants", "slug": "elephants-the-gentlest-of-giants", "date": "20/02/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Ele5.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Ele4.jpg", "mainContent": "

So, leading on from our last blog about Hyraxes being the closest living relative of the Elephant, we thought it was the perfect opportunity to tell you a bit more about earths largest land mammal.

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Elephants are complex, social and highly emotional creatures and they have a fascinating family dynamic. Here are 3 facts you may not have known about them.

 

1. Elephants live in matriarchal herds

 

Elephant families consist of a matriarch, her sisters, daughters and their calves. Occasionally, non-related Eephants join the herd, and Elephants may also adopt orphans. This means, within these herds, and with such a wide gap in age and experience amongst them, you can learn so much about their behaviour in such a short time. You can see how young calves interact with each other and play, or how mothers teach their calves how to use their trunks, and as sure as an Elephant never forgets, you can never get bored of watching them.

 

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(The Matriarch, cleverly manoeuvring herself between the herd and the vehicle. It’s amazing to see how much they care for and protect each other)

 

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(Northern Serengeti is an amazing place for Elephant viewing)

 

2. Elephants have highly emotional bonds amongst families and friends. 

 

Elephants have strong, intimate bonds amongst each other. Ever heard the saying \"memory like and elephant\"? That is because they will never forget an individual, even after only meeting them once. They have lifelong friendships with each other, and they even mourn the death of their loved ones. Research has even shown that individuals will return to areas where friends or family members have died and mothers have been seen grieving over stillborn calves. This is something very extraordinary in the animal kingdom.

 

\"\"(Here you can see quite a few generations in one herd)

 

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(A young calf staying close to her mother)

 

 3. Knowledge is passed in through generations 

 

Older Elephants gather so much information throughout their lives and they slowly impart that knowledge on to the next generation of youngsters. Information such as where to find food or water in extreme drought, or what food to avoid all together, needs to be passed on for the sake of their survival. Young calves are also taught the ins and outs of socialising with others and will often get told off if they misbehave (kind of sounds like me!)

 

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(Mummy… wait!!)

 

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Next time you are with a herd of Elephants, pay close attention and see what behaviours you can witness. Maybe it is the calves playing, maybe it is a new born learning how to use her trunk or maybe it is the ever-present mother keeping a watchful eye on the little ones.

 

\"\"Stay posted for our next blog coming out soon, we will be showcasing a very brightly coloured animal! Any guesses?

" }, { "title": "Hyrax Heaven", "slug": "hyrax-heaven", "date": "15/01/2018", "listingImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Hyrax_5.jpg", "headerImage": "https://www.nomad-tanzania.com/assets/uploads/images/Hyrax_6.jpg", "mainContent": "

Nestled in a grand Kopje in Northern Serengeti, this beautiful lodge we call home, shares its environment with many, very cute animals. From Dwarf Mongooses scurrying along the paths, to the Klipspringer standing guard on the rocks, to the ever-curious Hyraxes that lounge on our decks. From mid-morning to the late evening you can see them relaxing and enjoying the sun’s rays.

 

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(One of the residents making sure we are hard at work)

 

They have become such an important part of our lives in such a short time and I couldn’t imagine a day that they aren’t around. Their level of comfort around individual people they have never met before is admirable and they have made us feel such at home in Lamai.

 

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(This one was comfortable enough for me to crouch down about a meter away and capture this image)

 

Many people see Hyraxes whilst on safari, but what are Hyraxes exactly and what do we actually know about them? 

 

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(Hyraxes are incredible climbers, often balancing on very thin branches)

 

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(Hyraxes love eating new buds and shoots that come after the rains)

 

Hyraxes belong to a grouping of mammals called Afrotheria, that are living in Africa or have their origins in Africa. All Afrotherians share the exact same ancestor and come from the same branch on the Tree of Life. Can anyone guess any other Afrotherians?

 

\"\"(One of his closest cousins is the largest land mammal on earth)

 

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(A Hyraxes gestation period is 6 – 7 months, incredibly high for a mammal of this size)

 

 Other Afrotherians that you may have heard of are Elephants, Dugongs, Manatees, Shrews, Moles and Aardvark, and out of the living Afrotherians today, the Hyraxes closest cousins alive are the Elephant, Dugong and Manatee. Although all Afrotherians share few anatomical features, these ones in particular have similarities in their reproductive system and their tooth structure.

 

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(Just like Elephants, Male Hyrax have tusks that grow from their incisor teeth)

 

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(Just like the Elephant, male Hyraxes don’t have an external scrotum, their testicles are tucked away in their abdominal cavity)

 

It’s hard to believe that something so small is the cousin of the mighty Elephant, but it just shows how much there is to learn about wildlife. Next time you are on safari, make sure you put this knowledge to the test and impress your guide! Stay posted for our next blog on Elephants.

" }, { "title": "Serengeti, our new home", "slug": "serengeti-our-new-home", "date": "15/01/2018", "listingImage": "", "headerImage": "", "mainContent": "

We left Sand Rivers in the Selous with one smiling and one sobbing eye. The Selous has become such an important part of our life. The magic of this secluded place will never leave our hearts. The staff at Sand Rivers have become our family and we will miss them dearly. But it was time for us, time to move on, face new challenges and live new experiences. 

It is the Serengeti now, that we shall call our home and the crew at Lamai who will become our family. This thrilling and slightly daunting feeling is almost overwhelming as we step off the plane in Kogatende, Serengeti. 

We are speechless as we drive past beautiful flat top Acacia trees, high grass planes and  rock kopjes. We have been to the Serengeti before, we have even been to this very area before, but everything changes when a place becomes home. Every feeling is intensified and every tree, bird and rock becomes more significant.

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Crowned Crane walking through the tall grass in the Lamai Wedge, Northern Serengeti

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Topi on the open planes of the Lamai Wedge, Northern Serengeti. This highly social and fast antelope will only be found in the savannas, semi deserts and flood plains of Sub-Saharan Africa.

As we approach the Lodge, Helen and Clyde, our predecessors, are waiting for us waiving and greeting us with big smiles. We had a lovely time with them, learning about the camp, the staff and the area. We could not have asked for a better handover and are so very thankful to them for making our start at Lamai so wonderful. 

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Helen and Clyde on the sundowner kopje, taking a moment to say farewell to the place that was their home for over 2 years.

Now Lamai is ours, this beautiful camp, nestled in a kopje, overlooking the gorgeous planes of Northern Serengeti. We are so blessed to be falling asleep to the purr of Leopards, waking up to the gentle chirping of birds and watching elephants pass by in the distance as we have our lunch. 

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A family of Elephants enjoying the lush grass the recent rains have brought.

This is a place where anyone who loves Africa becomes content and anyone who visits for the first time will get hooked on the magic of the African bush. This wild and wonderful place is where everything is still as it should be. It is where the eagles soar high and free as the lions roam their territory, gazelles pronk in the afternoon sun and shy hyena call at night. 

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Hyena mama and cub cautiously scouting their surroundings.

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Hyena cub lounging outside its den, catching the last afternoon sun.

We cannot wait to experience every season in this incredible place and to let the Serengeti teach us all about its life.

" }, { "title": "Slippery Slithering Serpents", "slug": "slippery-slithering-serpents", "date": "18/11/2017", "listingImage": "", "headerImage": "", "mainContent": "

Occasionally we will come across a snake at Lamai, luckily, they tend to avoid us. In two years Helen and I have seen 6 snakes, so they are really quite shy and there is no need to worry about them if you are on a safari. A sighting does cause some excitement! The key is not to panic ��

One of our crew, Ibra, used to work at the snake park in Arusha and serves as our expert snake wrangler. Whenever a snake is spotted Ibra comes to the rescue, catching and relocating it a good distance from camp.  Snakes are territorial and we prefer they take up residence elsewhere… If guests are willing we will have a little show and tell, allowing for a better understanding of our slippery slithering friends. 

The included pictures are of a Tiger Snake, a White Lipped Snake, a Rock Python and a Black Spitting Cobra; one of which is venomous. 

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" } ] }