Way out west, this rugged national park is one of the least known, but most exciting wildlife areas in East Africa.

Katavi is like travelling back in time, maybe to the Pleistocene era. Animals seem bigger and more bestial. As a human, for once, you don't feel like you own the planet. It's a thrilling experience. Survival here depends on fragile seasonal rivers, the Katuma, the Kavu and the Kapapa. Between the rivers, huge herds of buffalo and other herbivores concentrate for the rich grass of four great floodplains, including (our own backyard) Chada.

As months wear on, the grass dries gold and withers. By the end of the dry season, it’s all going a bit mad. As water becomes limited, so animals are drawn to the riverbanks. Hippopotamus in their thousands cram dwindling pools, crocodiles dig riverbank caves. Buffalo and elephant compete for waterholes. Lion, hyenas and other predators know this and wildlife watching here becomes even more outstanding.

Katavi National Park

This is a far-flung, primeval bushland saturated with Africa's mega-beasts.

map of Katavi National Park
Greystoke

Greystoke

Chada

Chada

Expeditionary walking camp

Expeditionary walking camp

Since working with Nomad my farm has doubled in size and I take pride in providing fresh produce to Greystoke.

In a grove of sausage trees in Ruaha National Park on the banks of the Ifuguru River, in the best game area in the park.

This stylish but rustic camp has nabbed the most beautiful spot in Africa’s biggest wilderness park, the unheralded Selous.

Nomad safari guides operate the best camps in the best locations.

Greystoke Mahale, on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, has been around for many years. In the far and not much-explored west of Tanzania, it’s the best place in the country (probably in all Africa, actually, outside of the Democratic Republic of the Congo) to observe chimpanzees in their natural habitats.

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